Thursday, 24 March 2011

Plotting the mathematical function of x-girlfriends [Gf(x)]



Girlfriend x plus one
tends to get subjected
to the ornamental and furniture tastes
of girlfriend x
and the fashion choices
of girlfriend x minus one.

Girlfriend x had a smaller circumference,
possibly owing to the fact that she had a lower value for pie.

However girlfriend x plus one
has a much higher x-rating.

Perhaps we are three terms of an infinite yet bounded series:
an arithmetic progression
with an ever-smaller determinant.

We tend towards a place marked on our x-axes,
but our infinitesimals never quite add up
to the perfect integral of our thighs.

Although there is a limit
to the curve of their breasts,
we will only arrive there
when "why" tends to infinity.

The limit exists as an imaginary number:
the un-square root of minus one;
sometimes it is written as "i";

a point in Euclidean space
where love initially seems
to not be equal to anything,

but later
it turns out
that it is
equal to something
after all.

[Gf(x+1)]

[OfGf(x+1)=Gf(x)]

[FaGf(x+1)=Gf(x-1)]


[CGf(x) < CGf(x+1)]


Thursday, 17 March 2011

In brackets

Not any of these words belong to us,
not even that comma is really ours.
Nor that full stop.

I’m not sure who they do belong to;
perhaps the dictionary
or people who win poetry competitions
or layer upon layer of dead people.

In any case they inhabit us,
words of others’ choosing,
sentences of others’ design.

A horizonless grammar determining every moment
how we should think about everything,
even how to think about the grammar itself.

Secretly there is a horizon;
out beyond the edge of the wordable,
there are new lands of ecstasy that we have never before explored.

Come with me!
Set a trap,
designed so you cannot avoid understanding!

While no one is looking
see if you can’t squeeze a sentence in sideways.

Cut off the escape routes!
Then stick your foot in
and let the barbs tear the flesh from the bone!

If the trap works,
you will not have so much
to say about it.